ding!

I’ve been working with beefy virtual machines, docker containers, and build processes lately.  Believe it or not, working on projects aimed at making Mozilla developers more productive can mean executing code that can take anywhere from a minute to an hour, which in itself can hit how productive I can be.  For the longer tasks, I often get away […]

The post ding! appeared first on David Walsh Blog.

I’ve been working with beefy virtual machines, docker containers, and build processes lately.  Believe it or not, working on projects aimed at making Mozilla developers more productive can mean executing code that can take anywhere from a minute to an hour, which in itself can hit how productive I can be.  For the longer tasks, I often get away from my desk, make a cup of coffee, and check in to see how the rest of the Walsh clan is doing.

When I walk away, however, it would be nice to know when the task is done, so I can jet back to my desk and get back to work.  My awesome Mozilla colleague Byron “glob” Jones recently showed me his script for task completion notification and I forced him to put it up on GitHub so you all can get it too;  it’s called ding!

Once you have ding, you can do cools stuff like:

# ding somecommand
ding docker-machine start default
ding ./start-local-environment
ding ./refresh-environment

If the task completes successfully, you’ll hear a positive sound; if the command fails, you’ll hear a more negative sound — a simple, yet useful and meaningful detail.

There’s not much to explain except that ding is awesome and should check it out!

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